SIGMASTUDIO

SigmaStudio™ Graphical Development Tool
Manufactured by:

Features

  • .NET based integrated development environment (IDE).
  • Supports all SigmaDSP processors.
  • Supports ADSP-214xx SHARC processors when SigmaStudio for SHARC extension is installed.
  • Allows engineers with little or no DSP coding experience to add quality digital signal processing to their designs.
  • Offers a wide variety of signal processing algorithms integrated into an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI), allowing the creation of complicated audio signal flows.
  • The tool can help users lower their costs by reducing development time without sacrificing quality or performance.

Product Details

The SigmaStudio™ graphical development tool is the programming, development, and tuning software for the SigmaDSP® audio processors. Familiar audio processing blocks can be wired together as in a schematic, and the compiler generates DSP-ready code and a control surface for setting and tuning parameters. This tool allows engineers with no DSP code writing experience to easily implement a DSP into their design and yet is still powerful enough to satisfy the demands of experienced DSP designers. SigmaStudio links with both Analog Devices evaluation boards and production designs to provide full in-circuit real-time IC control.


SigmaStudio includes an extensive library of algorithms to perform audio processing such as filtering, mixing, and dynamics processing, as well as basic low-level DSP functions and control blocks. Advanced record-side processing algorithms such as Enhanced Stereo Capture and wind noise detection are included in the standard libraries. Plug-in algorithms from Analog Devices and 3rd party partners can be added to SigmaStudio's drag-and-drop library.


Along with its graphical DSP signal flow development, SigmaStudio also includes other features to speed up the design cycle from product concept to release. SigmaStudio includes tools for intuitively setting control registers, calculating tables of filter coefficients, visualizing filter magnitude and phase responses, generating C header files, and sequencing a series of controls to ease your transition from SigmaStudio to system implementation on your microcontroller.

Systems Requirements

X+
  • Windows 7 x86/x64
  • Windows Vista
  • Windows XP Professional or Home Edition with SP2
  • Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5
  • 128 MB of RAM (256 MB recommended)
  • 50 MB of available hard disk space
  • 1024 x 768 screen resolution
  • USB 2.0 data port (Required for use with Evaluation hardware only)

Related Hardware

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EZ Kits

Reviews

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Overview

3 Reviews
2 out of 3 (66%) customers recommend this product.
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Most Helpful Review

by KJBob
SigmaStudio opens up DSP to the rest of us who have been scared away by traditional programming. This allows engineers to introduce DSP where it hasn't been considered before. For example, in one of our products a ADAU1701 does a better job than the seven analog circuits it replaced. We would have not chosen this path with traditional DSP. SigmaStudio excels at visualizing and building analog techniques with the performance of DSP. Filters and effects are of course available, yet there's so much more. Want to build a phase-locked loop? A side-chain compressor? It's been done. If it doesn't work you can tweak it until it does, or try something else. All without a hot iron. Once you get used to how it all works, you'll be cooking up ideas literally in minutes (as with any tool it took much longer at first, but that's long since forgotten). SigmaStudio provides E2PROM ready code for those SigmaDSPs that feature self-booting, as well as "export" files you can include in your microcontroller program to have it boot the DSP. The latter method is more powerful, since your uC can then load DSP parameters on the fly -- for user EQ settings and such. Unfortunately, at this point you leave SigmaStudio's GUI behind and make friends with your uC's C compiler. Paradoxically, some have complained that there's no C compiler for SigmaDSP itself (gasp!). Updates arrive almost monthly. For best results stick to the release rev, although new features in beta are always tempting. With DSP chips and functions progressively added, documentation has fallen behind. It appears ADI has been waffling between supporting its help file (which I prefer) and the wiki -- resulting in neither being ideal. I work around this by experimenting with the blocks the way one might try out a function in C. And did I mention that ADI makes SigmaStudio available free (charging only for hardware)? All in all it's fun to use, and can deliver impressive results. Thus I eagerly await each release to see what else can be done with SigmaDSP.

Most Recent Review

by emh203
I have been hand coding audio algorithms in C & assembler for awhile. While I was skeptical to give up my text based processing flow, After 10 minutes with the 1701 dev-board I was sold. SigmaStudio made things very easy. Coming from a traditional DSP background, I can really appreciate the productivity increase with the tool. It allows me to focus on the core algorithm and testing rather than fighting with a compiler/assembler... This honestly covers 95% of everything DSP related for audio.

All Reviews

by emh203, 22 Dec 14
Awesome!
I have been hand coding audio algorithms in C & assembler for awhile. While I was skeptical to give up my text based processing flow, After 10 minutes with the 1701 dev-board I was sold. SigmaStudio made things very easy. Coming from a traditional DSP background, I can really appreciate the productivity increase with the tool. It allows me to focus on the core algorithm and testing rather than fighting with a compiler/assembler... This honestly covers 95% of everything DSP related for audio.
Was this Helpful?Helpful(0)
by KJBob, 5 Jul 14
Analog is cool again
SigmaStudio opens up DSP to the rest of us who have been scared away by traditional programming. This allows engineers to introduce DSP where it hasn't been considered before. For example, in one of our products a ADAU1701 does a better job than the seven analog circuits it replaced. We would have not chosen this path with traditional DSP. SigmaStudio excels at visualizing and building analog techniques with the performance of DSP. Filters and effects are of course available, yet there's so much more. Want to build a phase-locked loop? A side-chain compressor? It's been done. If it doesn't work you can tweak it until it does, or try something else. All without a hot iron. Once you get used to how it all works, you'll be cooking up ideas literally in minutes (as with any tool it took much longer at first, but that's long since forgotten). SigmaStudio provides E2PROM ready code for those SigmaDSPs that feature self-booting, as well as "export" files you can include in your microcontroller program to have it boot the DSP. The latter method is more powerful, since your uC can then load DSP parameters on the fly -- for user EQ settings and such. Unfortunately, at this point you leave SigmaStudio's GUI behind and make friends with your uC's C compiler. Paradoxically, some have complained that there's no C compiler for SigmaDSP itself (gasp!). Updates arrive almost monthly. For best results stick to the release rev, although new features in beta are always tempting. With DSP chips and functions progressively added, documentation has fallen behind. It appears ADI has been waffling between supporting its help file (which I prefer) and the wiki -- resulting in neither being ideal. I work around this by experimenting with the blocks the way one might try out a function in C. And did I mention that ADI makes SigmaStudio available free (charging only for hardware)? All in all it's fun to use, and can deliver impressive results. Thus I eagerly await each release to see what else can be done with SigmaDSP.
Was this Helpful?Helpful(2)
by ...., 25 Jun 14
Lots of bugs
The software itself is buggy, popping up unhelpful error messages like "CELL: Cellname" for no obvious reason, crashing and turning into a big red X, in previous versions you couldn't zoom in or out without breaking the UI and not being able to edit anything, the input boxes are too small for the numbers they can contain, so they line wrap, the positions of the inputs and outputs are wrong until you click on the boxes, the Compiler Output windows don't work so you have to look in a text file to see how much CPU you're using, etc. There are many different variants of some blocks, organized haphazardly, with the variants not consistently named ("w/ DET" vs "Separate Detect" vs "/Detect" all mean the same thing?), and most don't have any documentation. Pressing F1 opens the Help, but there's nothing for that block. The Decay property is labeled "dB/s", so you would expect a higher value to decay more rapidly, but higher values actually decay more slowly, with "23" never decaying at all. the input labeled "Q" is actually "1/Q", etc. There are also bugs in the algorithms used in the DSP itself. They respond quickly to problems in the forums, but you'll have to use workarounds while you wait for a version to be released that has them fixed, and they won't tell you how a block works internally.
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